A key success factor in business is execution. At the end of the day, money is made when business people smartly take carefully laid plans and resources to ‘make it happen’.  If you don't make things happen, there is no value delivery to the client, no money received and therefore no business.  Execution is where businesses grow or die, you succeed or fail and money is made or lost.  Some people are very good at execution while others get lost in strategizing, thinking, planning, designing, making, marketing and such - losing the opportunity to execute for business success.

How to Get Promoted and Succeed, Promoted and Succeed,..

How to Get Promoted and Succeed, Promoted and Succeed,..

There are many smart and pedigreed people who fail, or at least do not achieve as much success as they would like. Among entrepreneurs, it leads to business failure. Among the millions who work for companies small and large, many aspire to climb to senior positions but few attain them. The percentage who do is in the single digits. About 50% of the people who get promoted, fail, hit a wall or end up leaving (or having to leave) the company.

 

Listen to this podcast to learn how you can get promoted and succeed, get promoted and succeed, get….you get the idea. This is a conversation with Ron Carucci, Managing Partner of Navalent, an organizational consulting firm out of Seattle. He conducted a 10-year study of what make certain executives successful and others not. Find out how you too can get promoted and succeed, promoted and succeed,..

 

Ron’s clients include some of the biggest names in business. Ron has written over 75 articles for the Harvard Business Review and Forbes, given two TEDx talks and been on over a hundred podcasts.

 

Some of the questions he answers in a conversation with me on this podcast are:

  1. What are some key things you learned about what it takes to succeed in business?
  2. Do organizations accept the high failure rate among people who get promoted?
  3. Are people being prepared to succeed in new roles when they get promoted?
  4. What is the problem with sending up and coming executives to leadership programs at prestigious universities?
  5. What were the four patterns that consistently set leaders apart?
  6. What happens to executives who succeed only at three of the four patterns of success?
  7. Do you need to be older in order to ‘fit’ for a senior promotion?
  8. Can you get promoted and succeed if you started preparing to succeed earlier?
  9. What is a rubric for success if you want to get promotions and succeed in each successive role?
  10. What are the most common reasons fail when they get promoted to senior positions?
  11. what is the ultimate aspiration of an individual who continues from success to success?
  12. What are the differences between newly-promoted people who are successful and those who are nearly-successful?
  13. When is the best time to start preparing to succeed in your next promotion and the one after that?
  14. Why is there a gap between people knowing what needs to be done and doing what needs to be done?

 

Ron Carucci's books: http://www.navalent.com/resources/books

Ron Carucci's blog: http://www.navalent.com/resources/blog/author/ron-carucci

Ron Carucci’s firm’s website: www.navalent.com

Ron Carucci’s LinkedIn profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/navalent/

 

 

 

P.S. I realized a rather obvious thing. Most of us read articles like this but never act on it. You can only learn and get better results from the insights when you L.P.T. – listen, practice and tell/teach others, whether they are colleagues, friends or family. I hope you L.P.T. what you glean from this.

You can find additional podcast episodes on how you can become more successful in life and business at https://businessthinking.com/podcasts

If you found this article useful, please share it with your network – connections, groups, Facebook, twitter, etc.

 

50 Years of Leadership and Business Wisdom from Dr. Modesto Maidique

50 Years of Leadership and Business Wisdom from Dr. Modesto Maidique

Today’s show – 50 Years of Leadership and Business Wisdom from Dr. Modesto Maidique who is the co-founder of Analog Devices and the President Emeritus of Florida International University in Miami which has an enrolment of over 50,000 students. Dr. Maidique is internationally recognized as a leader in higher education and management of high technology enterprises.

Dr. Maidique is a Cuban immigrant who literally moved to the United States after high school, got into one of the top universities in the world – MIT – where he obtained his bachelors, masters and doctorate, went on to teach at MIT, Harvard and Stanford before co-founding Analog Devices. He later served as the President of Florida International University (FIU) for 23 years. He took a campus behind an abandoned airfield and built it up to the current campus with over 50,000 students and one of the largest public universities in the country. He started many schools at FIU including the colleges of Law, Engineering, Architecture, Public Health and the FIU College of Medicine. He knows a lot about leadership and heads up the Executive Director of the Center for Leadership at FIU. He has an upcoming article on the five levels of leadership appearing in the Sloan Management Review. He is also an expert on innovation and the management of technology.

Listen to Dr. Mitch Maidique in conversation with Ram Iyer and benefit from his 50 years of experience in leadership at https://businessthinking.com/podcasts.

He has served on several presidential commissions and advised many American presidents. The main campus of FIU is named after him – the Modesto Maidique campus. He is an entrepreneur, academic researcher, teacher and community activist. He is a contributing author to ten books. Maidique currently serves on the boards of National Semiconductor and the Carnival Corporation. 

In this wide-ranging interview, the Cuban immigrant who has risen to national prominence and is one of the most prominent Cuban Americans discusses:

  1. What was it like coming as a Cuban immigrant to study in the United States, that too at MIT, in the 60s?
  2. What is the value of education in the eyes of a Cuban immigrant?
  3. Should the education system still continue people to train students to specialize in narrow specialties?
  4. What is the value of a broad education which includes the arts and the humanities even in technical fields?
  5. Do the people with the highest IQ invariably succeed in life?
  6. What is the value of an MIT education? What did Mitch learn that assisted his ascent to senior leadership positions, advising presidents and embracing a mission that is atypical?
  7. What are the two primary things leaders do?
  8. Is a leader different from the person that he or she is?
  9. Who is the leadership expert that Mitch admires the most in the United States?
  10. What is Mitch’s approach to new and complex problems?
  11. What are the five levels of leadership in Mitch’s model (will be published in the Sloan Management Review later this year)?
  12. What are the issues of having a university campus named after a living person?
  13. What was Mitch’s mission and how does his legacy motivate him even today?

Listen to Dr. Mitch Maidique in conversation with Ram Iyer and benefit from his 50 years of experience in leadership at https://businessthinking.com/podcasts.

 

P.S. I realized a rather obvious thing. Most of us read articles like this but never act on it. You can only learn and get better results from the insights when you L.P.T. – listen, practice and tell/teach others, whether they are colleagues, friends or family. I hope you L.P.T., whatever you glean from this.

You can find additional podcast episodes on how you can become more successful in life and business at https://businessthinking.com/podcasts

If you found this article useful, please share it with your network – connections, groups, Facebook, twitter, etc.

 

P.S. I realized a rather obvious thing. Most of us read articles like this but never act on it. You can only learn and get better results from the insights when you L.P.T. – listen, practice and tell/teach others, whether they are colleagues, friends or family. I hope you L.P.T., whatever you glean from this.

You can find additional podcast episodes on how you can become more successful in life and business at https://businessthinking.com/podcasts

If you found this article useful, please share it with your network – connections, groups, Facebook, twitter, etc.

Triple Play: 3 things to consider when deciding whether to litigate

3 things to consider when deciding whether to litigate

4 Keys to Great Decision-Making

Great leadership is based on making sound decisions. It’s simply part of the role. But it can also be one of the toughest things to maneuver. When you make a decision, you have to know how long to stay the course and when to reverse direction.

There are obviously simple decisions—the black-and-white variety—that don’t require a great deal of judgment. Those are the decisions they teach you in business school. But in my experience, most of the answers aren’t easy. Decision-making has many shades of gray.

Making great decisions

Stanford University professor Chip Heath and his brother, Dan, a senior fellow at Duke University’s Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE), distill decades of academic research into a tool kit for practitioners about decision-making in their book DECISIVE.

Great Leaders are Great Decision-Makers

Great leaders understand how to balance emotion with reason and make decisions that positively impact themselves, their employees, their customers and stakeholders, and their organizations.
When we think of what makes someone a great leader, one characteristic that comes to mind is decisiveness. We do not envision successful leaders standing around appearing unclear and uncertain. Instead, we view them as people who are able to quickly arrive at their decisions and communicate the goals to others.

20 Business Lessons You Don't Want To Learn The Hard Way

Every business owner will have his or her own trials, but here are 20 lessons you don't want to learn the hard way…….

Are You Overwhelmed? Take Advantage of these Simple 'Neurohacking' Techniques

The entrepreneur's brain at times can resemble the grand finale of a million-dollar fireworks show. Music's blaring and things are blowing up all over the place. And while it's pretty and entertaining, it's also out of control, hard to follow, and a bit exhausting.

An 18-Minute Plan for Managing Your Day

We start every day knowing we’re not going to get it all done. So how we spend our time is a key strategic decision. That’s why it’s a good idea to create a to do list and an ignore list. The hardest attention to focus is our own. But even with those lists, the challenge, as always, is execution. How can you stick to a plan when so many things threaten to derail it? How can you focus on a few important things when so many things require your attention?

How to Make Better Decisions

It’s estimated that in an average day, you will make somewhere around 35,000 decisions. Many of them are unconscious, but the sheer volume is staggering. What to wear, where to eat, how to get to work, who to call when you get there, all of these little things add up. You could easily argue then, that learning a bit more about the decision making process, and improving your decision making, is a worthy investment.